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~Welcome~

A true love of all things natural and beneficial to the body, mind, and spirit. Intrigued with knowledge regarding herbs and foods for better health.  The focus here is improve the way we eat, think, and feel.  I love juicing, raw foods, growing my own food, and re-purposing, recycling and re-designing old garden, farm, home, and yard items for all kinds of uses and decor in and around the home and garden…in other words – I have a blast and love what I do.

We have a little studio/shop where we will soon begin to turn trash into treasures… planters, lights, birdhouses, planting boxes, infinite possibilities.  I am so excited about this I can barely sleep.  We will also build some benches and tables and restore some wonderful old things.  Everything from our heart and into the house, porch or yard.  Yay!!!

The Greenhouse is in the planning stage and hopefully here by Spring, which is only a few weeks away!!  There will be herbs and veggies and plants.  The Greenhouse will be about 8′ x 20′ so we will see just how much I can cram in it but it should be awesome.  And then there is composting…not something I am familiar with at all but I am ready to tackle it for the sake of the soil that will produce the edible garden and the beauty of the plants.

We also have a beautiful guest lodging… Dragonfly Mountain Lodge
It is my opinion the brain functions better with a healthier body.  I could be wrong …. probably not. :)

Flavonoids can restore Brahma functionality by reversing acetylation.

PMID:

Carcinogenesis. 2014 May 29. Epub 2014 May 29. PMID: 24876151

Abstract Title:

Flavonoids from each of the six structural groups reactivate BRM, a possible cofactor for the anticancer effects of flavonoids.

Abstract:

Flavonoids have been extensively studied and are well documented to have anticancer effects, but it is not entirely known how they impact cellular mechanisms to elicit these effects. In the course of this study, we found that a variety of different flavonoids readily restored Brahma (BRM) in BRM-deficient cancer cell lines. Flavonoids from each of the six different structural groups were effective at inducing BRM expression as well as inhibiting growth in these BRM-deficient cancer cells. By blocking the induction of BRM with shRNA, we found that flavonoid-induced growth inhibition was BRM dependent. We also found that flavonoids can restore BRM functionality by reversing BRM acetylation. In addition, we observed that an array of natural flavonoid-containing products both induced BRM expression as well as deacetylated the BRM protein. We also tested two of the BRM-inducing flavonoids (Rutin and Diosmin) at both a low and a high dose on the development of tumors in an established murine lung cancer model. We found that these flavonoids effectively blocked development of adenomas in the lungs of wild-type mice but not in that of BRMnull mice. These data demonstrate that BRM expression and function are regulated by flavonoids and that functional BRM appears to be a prerequisite for the anticancer effects of flavonoids both in vitro and in vivo.

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The severity of gastric mucosal injury produced by aspirin was significantly greater in the morning compared to the evening.

PMID:

Chronobiol Int. 1987 ;4(1):111-6. PMID: 3677213

Abstract Title:

Day and night aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage and protection by ranitidine in man.

Abstract:

The severity of gastric mucosal injury produced by aspirin (ASA) was endoscopically assessed during morning and evening studies in 10 healthy, male volunteers. In a randomized, double-blind design, subjects received either ASA (1300 mg) alone or ASA (1300 mg) plus Ranitidine (150 mg) or placebo tablets during morning and evening studies. Each subject had 3 morning and 3 evening studies. The severity of damage produced by ASA was assessed by counting the number of punctate mucosal hemorrhages observed in the gastric antrum and low-body. This study demonstrated (1) wide intersubject variability in the severity of damage produced by ASA (range of 47-1030 lesions/subject in morning studies), (2) significant protection against ASA-induced damage by Ranitidine and (3) significantly greater damage produced by ASA in the morning compared to the evening studies. Because evening acid secretory rates are higher and because ASA-induced damage is believed to be acid-dependent, this last observation was unexpected. It suggests mucosal resistance is higher in the evening and raises the possibility that there may be circadian variation in gastric mucosal resistance.

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