4 Secrets to a Younger, Healthier You

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Sometimes, it’s simply a matter of eating foods that offer anti-aging benefits (there are many and not to worry, they taste great). Other times, a supplement may be in order. Oh, and of course, a beauty product here and there never hurts. Here are four health boosters that will help you look and feel amazing – inside and out.
1. RESVERATROL
What it is: A powerful, naturally occurring polyphenol found in the stems, seeds and skin of red wine grapes, and other plants.
What it does: Research suggests that resveratrol boosts energy; inhibits the development of cancer (including breast cancer); may help prevent heart disease; could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting; and according to a Harvard University study, it might even slow the aging process. Resveratrol also helps fight environmental toxins to keep skin supple and reduce wrinkles.
To eat: Peanut butter, red grapes, red and white wine, red grape juice, blueberries, cranberries
2. OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS
What they are: Unsaturated fatty acids that the body needs to function and stay healthy.
What they do: Omega-3s can reduce your risk of heart disease by 30 percent; they soothe inflammation; regulate cholesterol; alleviate symptoms of depression; and help keep your skin glowing.
To eat: Salmon, flaxseed, walnuts, anchovies, sardines
3. ANTIOXIDANTS
What they are: Nutrients (vitamins and minerals found in foods) as well as enzymes(proteins in your body that assist in chemical reactions). Vitamins A, C, and E are biggies.
What they do: Antioxidants help delay aging and reduce our vulnerability to cancer, heart disease, and diabetes; they also help reduce inflammation and may stop pigment formation (think age spots); antioxidants also help keep skin bright and supple.
To eat: Spinach, strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, prunes, raisins, kale, pumpkin seeds
4. CoQ10
What it is: Ubiquinone, also called Coenzyme Q10 or CoQ10, is a natural, powerful antioxidant that’s naturally produced in the body. It’s found in cell membranes in the heart, kidneys, lungs, spleen, liver, adrenal glands, and the pancreas. Coenzyme Q10 is essential to our health, but unfortunately, our body’s level of the enzyme decreases with age.
What it does: Like all antioxidants, CoQ10 can help boost heart health and cut your cancer risk; it can also reduce the incidence of migraines by up to 50 percent, and fights periodontal disease. It keeps skin firm and smooth, and reduces the severity of wrinkles.
To eat: Pistachios, walnuts, mackerel, salmon, sardines
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Insulin use is associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in the short-term in diabetics.In this animal study measles vaccine did not prevent infection or disease against wild type MeV.Beyond SunscreenBanish Doggie Breath4 Secrets to a Younger, Healthier You

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~Welcome~

A true love of all things natural and beneficial to the body, mind, and spirit. Intrigued with knowledge regarding herbs and foods for better health.  The focus here is improve the way we eat, think, and feel.  I love juicing, raw foods, growing my own food, and re-purposing, recycling and re-designing old garden, farm, home, and yard items for all kinds of uses and decor in and around the home and garden…in other words – I have a blast and love what I do.

We have a little studio/shop where we will soon begin to turn trash into treasures… planters, lights, birdhouses, planting boxes, infinite possibilities.  I am so excited about this I can barely sleep.  We will also build some benches and tables and restore some wonderful old things.  Everything from our heart and into the house, porch or yard.  Yay!!!

The Greenhouse is in the planning stage and hopefully here by Spring, which is only a few weeks away!!  There will be herbs and veggies and plants.  The Greenhouse will be about 8′ x 20′ so we will see just how much I can cram in it but it should be awesome.  And then there is composting…not something I am familiar with at all but I am ready to tackle it for the sake of the soil that will produce the edible garden and the beauty of the plants.

We also have a beautiful guest lodging… Dragonfly Mountain Lodge
It is my opinion the brain functions better with a healthier body.  I could be wrong …. probably not. :)

Insulin use is associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in the short-term in diabetics.

PMID:

Ann Oncol. 2014 Jul 23. Epub 2014 Jul 23. PMID: 25057164

Abstract Title:

Diabetes, antidiabetic medications and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the international pancreatic cancer case-control consortium.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, but the magnitude of the risk and the time-risk relationship are unclear, and there is limited information on the role of antidiabetic medications.PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed individual-level data from 15 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 8305 cases and 13,987 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates RESULTS: Overall, 1155 (15%) cases and 1087 (8%) controls reported a diagnosis of diabetes two or more years before cancer diagnosis (or interview, for controls), corresponding to an odds ratio (OR) of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.72-2.09). Consistent risk estimates were observed across strata of selected covariates, including body mass index and tobacco smoking. Pancreatic cancer risk decreased with duration of diabetes, but a significant excess risk was still evident 20 or more years after diabetes diagnosis (OR 1.30 95% CI 1.17-2.03). Among diabetics, long duration of oral antidiabetic use was associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69, for≥15 years). Conversely, insulin use was associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the short-term (OR 5.60, 95% CI 3.75-8.35 for

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In this animal study measles vaccine did not prevent infection or disease against wild type MeV.

PMID:

MBio. 2014 ;5(2):e01047. Epub 2014 Apr 15. PMID: 24736226

Abstract Title:

Vaccine-induced measles virus-specific T cells do not prevent infection or disease but facilitate subsequent clearance of viral RNA.

Abstract:

Infection with wild-type measles virus (MeV) induces lifelong protection from reinfection, and parenteral delivery of the live attenuated measles vaccine (LAV) also provides protection from measles. The level of neutralizing antibody is a good indicator of protection, but the independent roles of MeV-specific antibody and T cells have not been identified. In this study, macaques immunized with LAV through a nebulizer and a mouthpiece developed MeV-specific T-cell responses but not neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with wild-type MeV, these animals developed rashes and viremias similar to those in naive animals but cleared viral RNA from blood 25 to 40 days faster. The nebulizer-immunized animals also had more robust MeV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses than the naive animals after challenge, characterized by a higher number and better durability of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells. Induction of MeV-specific circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of producing multiple cytokines correlated with clearance of viral RNA in the nebulizer-immunized macaques. These studies demonstrated that MeV-specific T-cell immunity alone did not prevent measles, but T-cell priming enhanced the magnitude, durability, and polyfunctionality of MeV-specific T cells after challenge infection and correlated with more rapid clearance of MeV RNA. IMPORTANCE The components of vaccine-induced immunity necessary for protection from infection and disease have not been clearlyidentified for most vaccines. Vaccine development usually focuses on induction of antibody, but T-cell-based vaccines are also under development. The live attenuated measles vaccine (LAV) given subcutaneously induces both T cells and neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection from infection. LAV delivered to the upper respiratory tract through a nebulizer and mouthpiece induced a T-cell response but no neutralizing antibody. These T-cell-primed macaques demonstrated no protection from rash or viremia when challenged with wild-type MeV, but viral RNA was cleared more rapidly than in unimmunized animals. Thus, T-cell immunity did not protect from infection or acute disease but facilitated virus clearance during recovery. These studies demonstrate the importance and independent roles of T cells and antibody in protection and recovery from measles.

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